Project: Proyecto Manta

Listening for Mantas

Imagine you’re in a water taxi, speeding along the lush southern coast of Bahia de Banderas in Mexico. Maybe you’re visiting to experience the rich marine ecosystems that the bay has to offer, and you’re on your way out to a quiet little village with a famous snorkeling spot out front. With no warning a...

Why are there mantas in Bahia de Banderas, Mexico?

Mantas are highly mobile organisms and thus can be very difficult to find and study; however, in Mexico they frequent the Pacific Coast, especially Bahia de Banderas. As stated by Stewart et al. (2014)[1], Proyecto Manta has been monitoring the mantas in the area since August 2013, and we have observed densities as high as...

Tracking Mantas in Pacific Mexico

Understanding how marine vertebrates move throughout the oceans is critical to effectively protecting and managing these species. Mantas are no exception, and are perhaps one of the most poorly studied marine species on the planet. Using archival satellite tags, which provide satellite-transmitted location estimates from data collected during a tag deployment, researchers from Scripps Institution...

Monitoring manta rays in Bahia de Banderas, Mexico

Oceanic manta rays are one of the most mysterious animals in the ocean. Despite growing up to 25 feet across and being a favorite of divers and snorkelers all over the world, very little scientific research has been done on manta rays, leaving much of their biology, ecology and population dynamics completely unknown. One of the...

Proyecto Manta: What is Proyecto Manta Program?

Oceanic manta rays are threatened around the world by targeted fisheries and bycatch, and Mexico is home to one of the most important populations of this species in the world. Mantas were fished heavily in the Gulf of California in the 1980s and ’90s, and the population in the Gulf has not recovered despite national fisheries bans for mantas over the last 20 years. Proyecto Manta aims to identify the connectivity between manta populations elsewhere in Pacific Mexico, including Bahia de Banderas and the Revillagigedo Archipelago, and the Tropical Eastern Pacific to determine how bycatch of these animals in Mexico and targeted fisheries elsewhere may impact these populations. Proyecto Manta relies on partnerships with universities and NGOs in Mexico and international partners, and uses a wide variety of research methods to generate data that supports conservation action.


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